INDIAN MUSIC FORUM ARCHIVES: Tabla Forum: Benaras Gharana - Teka Barant

 

Author Message
Rishi Ram Nath Misra
Benaras Gharana - Teka Barant Dec 28, 2003 09:29 a.m.


I am looking for examples of teka barant
which artists from the Benaras Gharana play especially in Teentaal. A few examples will suffice. Thanx.

Here's a Delhi Kaida that i have learnt

Dhage tite Gege Tite Gege Nage Tina GeGe
Tite Gege Nage Tite Gege Nage Tina Kina
complete Khali portion.

Shawn
Re:Benaras Gharana - Teka Barant Dec 30, 2003 01:07 p.m.


FYI, theka barant is more commonly called Benarsi Theka and some people call it Peshkar (which is really a term more accurate for other gharanas, in my opinion).

This is the type of composition that I'm not really inclined to share via Internet, for several reasons. Mainly, because the bols are missing vital information about how to perform the theka. I would suggest that if you really want to learn how to perform Benarsi Theka, that you find a guru from the Benares gharana and study with him/her.


Shawn
http://www.percussionist.net
Chris Pereji
Re:Benaras Gharana - Teka Barant Jan 03, 2004 06:52 p.m.


Shawn,

I understand your reasons for not sharing the 'Benaras Gharana - Teka Barant' via the internet.

However, I feel that there is a possibility that readers who are well versed in Benares gharana can offer some help - if the phrases are posted on this forum. Not all the phrases that are posted here carry instructions on how to play them. Quite a few tabla players have posted their replies on this forum by way of instructions on how to play a certain phrase etc.

I am confident that somone will come forward to post material related to 'barant'. I am curious to read..

Thanks.

-Chris

Gabriel
Re:Benaras Gharana - Teka Barant Jan 04, 2004 09:04 p.m.


Dear Chris,

I agree with Shawn about the "vital information missing" in the notation system. The beauty in this type of composition is in both the bayan inflections and the fragile balance of the sounds, it's impossible to write that� at least to me ! But I also understand your point of view. So I'll try my very best to be as clear as possible while I highly encourage you to listen to such compositions.

Here is 5 cycles of a type of Benarsi Theka that Pandit Kishen Maharaj would perform. The theme is from one of the famous ka�da from Benares garhana and is played here in a rather slow tempo (50 to 60 beats per minute). There is always 4 bols per matra except when a dash is written "-". This sign equal a silence of a quarter beat.

dh� : RH harmonic on lao (maiden) + LF open bayan

t� : RH harmonic on lao (maiden) + LH closed bayan (like ke)

n� and t� : RH harmonic on chanti (chat)

dh� : RH harmonic on chanti (chat) + LH open bayan

tri : RH middle + ring finger followed by index finger on syahi (makes 2 sounds very closed to each other)

kra : LH closed bayan followed by RH middle + ring finger on syahi (makes also 2 sounds very closed to each other)

The phrase "dh� ge dh� n�" should always have accents on the first and third bol. Therefore I recommend this fingering for the left hand : middle, index, middle. Here the middle finger will have the accents.

The phrase "t� ke t� n�" should also have accents on the first and third bol. Therefore I recommend to split the left hand in two and keep the same kind of motion with the hand then if played open.

1
dh� ge dh� n�, tri kra dh� n�, - - dh� ge, t� n� tri kra
t� ke t� n�, tri kra t� n�, - - dh� ge, dh� n� tri kra
dh� ge dh� n�, tri kra dh� n�, - - dh� ge, t� n� tri kra
t� ke t� n�, tri kra t� n�, - - dh� ge, dh� n� tri kra

2
dh� ge dh� n�, tri kra dh� n�, dh� ge dh� n�, tri kra dh� n�
dh� ge dh� n�, tri kra dh� n�, - - dh� ge, t� n� tri kra
t� ke t� n�, tri kra t� n�, t� ke t� n�, tri kra t� n�
dh� ge dh� n�, tri kra dh� n�, - - dh� ge, dh� n� tri kra

3
- - dh� ge, dh� n� tri kra, dh� ge dh� n�, tri kra dh� ge
dh� n� tri kra, dh� ge dh� n�, tri kra dh� ge, t� n� tri kra
- - t� ke, t� n� tri kra, t� ke t� n�, tri kra dh� ge
dh� n� tri kra, dh� ge dh� n�, tri kra dh� ge, dh� n� tri kra

4
- - dh� ge, dh� n� tri kra, dh� ge dh� ge, t� n� tri kra
- - t� ke, t� n� tri kra, dh� ge dh� ge, dh� n� tri kra
- - dh� ge, dh� n� tri kra, dh� ge dh� ge, t� n� tri kra
- - t� ke, t� n� tri kra, dh� ge dh� ge, dh� n� tri kra

5
- dh� tri kra, dh� n� tri kra, dh� ge dh� ge, t� n� tri kra
- t� tri kra, t� n� tri kra, dh� ge dh� ge, dh� n� tri kra
- dh� tri kra, dh� n� tri kra, dh� ge dh� ge, t� n� tri kra
- t� tri kra, t� n� tri kra, dh� ge dh� ge, dh� n� tri kra

It surely doesn't cover anything more then a star in the universe but I hope it stimulates your curiosity in one of my favorite section of the tabla solo repertoire from Benares style.

Sincerely, Gabriel

aanaddha
Re:Benaras Gharana - Teka Barant Jan 04, 2004 10:54 p.m.


Gabriel,
Thanks for the excellent notation. This is really sweet - I can almost hear it - in fact, I think I have; doesn't a young Kishen Maharaj play this same or similiar composition on the Gottlieb recordings?


Aanaddha

Gabriel
Re:Benaras Gharana - Teka Barant Jan 05, 2004 01:43 a.m.


Dear Aanaddha,

Although similar, it is partially taken from an other recording intitle "a live tabla solo recital" (it is not a transcription). This particular recital is simply nice, very mellow, sweet and yet deep and most of all plaisant to the hear. A fullfilling experience !

Sincerely, Gabriel

aanaddha
Re:Benaras Gharana - Teka Barant Jan 05, 2004 07:42 a.m.


I think what makes both recordings particularly seductive is the Pandit's skillful and carefully developed exposition of the essential pauses as he introduces greater variations of the flams and resonant strokes. It is a refreshing antidote to the superheated relas we expect to hear in every tabla solo.
Can anyone cite an example of this wonderful form of "Teka Barant" from a recording on the Sharda Sahai branch or another branch of Benares Gharana?

Aanaddha

Chris
Re:Benaras Gharana - Teka Barant Jan 09, 2004 11:36 p.m.


Hi Gabriel,

Yes, Shawn's reasons for being disinclined to post phrases of Teka Barant are legitimate. I agree with you and Shawn, there is absolutely no substitute to listeing to the sound and watching how the phrases are played.

I am glad that you took the time to provide some insight into the sounds of these bols and the way to play them. Here are the resulting benefits:

1. The subsequent replies certainly lead to sources/samples that one can listen to.
2. Just the recitation of the bols is a pleasing execrcise catering to one's sense of sound and rhythm.
3. One can take these phrases to a professional tabla player and ask for a demo.
4. These phrases certainly introduce the listener to the beauty of the Benares gharana.

And I was more than confident that someone like you would come forward to pitch in.

My appreciation is in the superlative.

-Chris

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